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A Wave From The East, Regular Fuji Print - Tote bag

Size Guide
Tote Bags

Bag size: 15″ × 15″ (38.1 × 38.1 cm)
Capacity: 2.6 US gal (10 l)
Handle length 11.8″ (30 cm), width 1″ (2.5 cm)

Size Guide
Tote Bags

Bag size: 15″ × 15″ (38.1 × 38.1 cm)
Capacity: 2.6 US gal (10 l)
Handle length 11.8″ (30 cm), width 1″ (2.5 cm)

From the collections of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, A Wave from the East is all about the ukiyo-e prints of Japanese genius Katsushika Hokusai, who brought Japanese culture to the global audience in the 19th century. The presence of Mount Fuji is captured in Hokusai’s ‘Fuji from Kanya on the Tôkaidô’ – a combination of Japan’s most iconic artist and landmark.

Are you an advocate of reusing shopping bags to help our natural environment like those in these prints by Hokusai? Our tote bags are perfect for adding a little art history in your life with style.
Inspired by:
Fuji from Kanaya on the Tôkaidô (Tôkaidô Kanaya no Fuji), from the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjûrokkei)
Katsushika Hokusai (Japanese, 1760-1849)
Edo period, about 1830-1831
Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and colour on paper
Accession Number: 11.17621
© Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Katsushika Hokusai. Lived 1760-1849

Remembered as Hokusai, this Japanese artist was a painter for the ukiyo-e genre. This art movement involved the production of woodblock prints and paintings of landscapes, flora, fauna, female beauties and more. He created the iconic Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji including the internationally acclaimed prints of the Great Wave. This was created as a result of the Japanese boom in domestic tourism of the time. By modernising traditional print styles through innovations in subject and composition, Hokusai was among the first artists to shape, and be shaped by globalisation, being influenced by international movements.

Hokusai was incredibly creative and innovative and never stopped learning or
experimenting. He produced 30,000 paintings, sketches, prints and picture books over his lifetime. And he changed his name over 30 times, each time he achieved a new level of artistic skill. The name we know him by, Katsushika, refers to the part of Tokyo where he was born. Hokusai means ‘North Studio’ in honour of the North Star, an important Buddhist symbol. The final name on his tombstone is Gakyo Rojin Manji—‘Old Man Mad about Painting.’ He never stayed in one place long either. He hated cleaning, so every time his studio got too dirty he just moved.

Fuji from Kanaya on the Tôkaidô (Tôkaidô Kanaya no Fuji), from the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjûrokkei)
Edo period, about 1830-1831
Woodblock print (nishiki-e); ink and colour on paper

The mix of colours and lines used to emphasise the motions of waves in the Oi river and the travellers crossing is archetypically Hokusai’s style of printwork. He has depicted the freight and palanquins that were transported on rafts by ‘river-crossers’ dressed in loin-cloths. Mount Fuji again is shown in the distance, with the swift, whooshing waves in the foreground. Classically Hokusai, this colourful image was printed with wood blocks and repeated numerous times.

• 100% spun polyester fabric
• Maximum weight limit: 44lbs (20 kg)
• Dual handles made from 100% natural cotton bull denim
• The handles can slightly differ depending on the fulfillment location
• Blank product components sourced from China

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